Wednesday, December 31, 2008

The Counterintuitive Time: 4. Time and General Relativity


This is a series of posts about the counterintuitive nature of time in Physics. This post presents some difficult aspects of time in General Relativity, such as the notion of curved spacetime, the looping time, and the idea of the beginning of time.

After the Special Relativity, Einstein tried to express various physical laws in this formalism. Basically, their mathematical form is required to be invariant at Lorentz transformations. The main difficulty he encountered was to express Newton’s gravitation field in this way. After many years of research, Einstein obtained the movement of bodies under the effect of gravity as simply an inertial movement in a curved spacetime. The inertia and the gravity become unified. The spacetime itself is curved by the masses, and the universal attraction was just an effect of this curvature. General Relativity was born. The experimental consequences eventually confirmed the theory, which become widely accepted. Among its surprising features is that that the time flow changes in the presence of massive bodies.

The main equation of General Relativity, Einstein’s equation, relates the curvature to the distribution of energy. One very important difference between this equation, and the previously known equations in mathematical Physics, is the following: finding the solution, means also finding the background (meaning the spacetime itself). In the Newtonian and special relativistic cases, the spacetime was fixed, but in General Relativity, it is part of the solution itself. Perhaps, this is the most striking difference.

The main counterintuitive aspect of the curved spacetime is caused by our tendency to consider it as a subspace of a space with more dimensions. Many persons, when learn for the first time that the spacetime is curved, tend to interpret this as being curved in a fifth dimension. As a simpler but historic example, when we think at a curved surface, we tend to consider it a subspace of the Euclidean space. Gauss realized that the intrinsic geometry of every surface can be expressed independently on the Euclidean space in which this is embedded. The main ingredient is the metric tensor, which provides a point-dependant measure of the lengths of the curves embedded in the surface. Riemann generalized the surfaces to curved spaces with any number of dimensions. Their work helps understanding that the curved spaces in Riemannian geometry do not rely on a Euclidean space in which they may be embedded. Einstein found the four-dimensional Riemannian geometry as the ideal tool for General Relativity, provided that we replace the Euclidean metric tensor with the Lorentz metric.

The Einstein’s equation may have solutions that contain closed timelike curves. Spacetime may be curved in such a manner, that the future of an event becomes also its past. This looping time highly contradicts our intuition. Yet, unlike the other counterintuitive aspects of time, this one may not even exist, as Hawking’s Chronology Protection Conjecture states.

Another hard to grasp aspect of time is the beginning. Our experience teaches us to consider the time as being linear, infinitely continued in past and future. Why do we have this intuition, considering that our lives are finite? Perhaps because the daily events succeed linearly, at our scales, and because the History of our countries, and of our planet, and solar systems, appear to be linear. But when we hear about the Big Bang, two questions we may find natural is “what was before the Big Bang?”, and “when happened the Big Bang?”. We find difficult to accept that even the time may have a beginning.

Other difficult aspects of time in General Relativity are related to special situations, like the time in the presence of a Black Hole, in a Worm Hole, time traveling using Worm Holes, Hawking’s imaginary time, the time near/at the initial singularity. I will not detail these problems.


4 comments:

Rares Ispas said...

Salut Cristi,

Am si eu o nelamurire, poate ma ajuti tu, scuza-ma daca este prea naiva sau am pus-o in locul nepotrivit:

De ce si-au pus fizicienii de gat pietroiul numit teoria Big Bang-ului si au rejectat teoria Steady State?

Conform http://www.space.com/24781-big-bang-theory-alternatives-infographic.html
universul are o marime mai mare decat ar fi explicata de o expansiune chiar la viteza luminii. Or, din punctul meu de vedere, ipoteza hiperinflatiei, si anume ca Univ s-a expansionat de un numar urias de ori intr-o infima fractiune de secunda nu este altceva decat "magie", si anume concentrarea tuturor gaurilor din teorie intr-un singur punct, care functioneaza complet diferit de tot restul si pentru care nu exista explicatie. In plus, daca ar fi existat Big Bang, Red Shift-ul nu ar mai fi fost isotropic, caracteristica explicata foarte bine de Steady State. Iar radiatia de fond a Universului poate fi explicata chiar de aceasta creare a materiei din vidul cuantic.

Si mai am o intrebare, si mai de ageamiu: de ce insista Cern sa descopere "gravitonii" (dupa cum inteleg eu ca inseamna bosonii Higgs), cand de fapt revelatia lui Einstein este ca gravitatia este data de curbura spatiului? Nu cumva fiecare unda genereaza curbura spatiului, mai mult sau mai putin?


Rares

Cristi Stoica said...

Salut Rares,

> De ce si-au pus fizicienii de gat pietroiul numit teoria Big Bang-ului si au rejectat teoria Steady State?

Cel putin pentru mine nu e de la sine inteles ca teoria Big Bang e evident gresita. Ambele teorii explica ceva si au intrebari la care nu ofera un raspuns evident, dar cred ca datele sunt in favoarea big bang + inflatie. Big bangul e coroborat de mai multe surse, inclusiv varsta universului si teorema singularitatii a lui Hawking. Daca exista inca o minoritate care se ocupa de steady state nu stiu, dar m-as bucura, pentru ca mereu trebuiesc verificare alternativele. In clipa de fata nu ma intereseaza prea mult, desi am scris cate ceva despre big bang (http://arxiv.org/abs/1112.4508, http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.1819, http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.3382). O sa iti dau niste raspunsuri, dar cel mai bine te lamuresti tu.

> universul are o marime mai mare decat ar fi explicata de o expansiune chiar la viteza luminii

Expansiunea poate fi la orice viteza, fara a incalca relativitatea, ci de fapt datorita ei. Vezi de exemplu http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=387

> radiatia de fond a Universului poate fi explicata chiar de aceasta creare a materiei din vidul cuantic.

Radiatia de fond a fost prezisa de big bang, iar steady state a incercat abia dupa ce a fost gasita sa o acomodeze. Vezi si
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_microwave_background

In http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steady_State_theory sunt date niste motive sumare ale respingerii steady state, dezvoltate mai mult in referintele de la sfarsit.

Vezi si http://www.aip.org/history/cosmology/ideas/bigbang.htm


> de ce insista Cern sa descopere "gravitonii" (dupa cum inteleg eu ca inseamna bosonii Higgs), cand de fapt revelatia lui Einstein este ca gravitatia este data de curbura spatiului? Nu cumva fiecare unda genereaza curbura spatiului, mai mult sau mai putin?

Gravitonul nu e totuna cu bosonul Higgs. Bosonul Higgs rezolva probleme din modelul standard al particulelor elementare, care e independent de relativitatea generala. Gravitonul e postulat in gravitatia cuantica. Din cauza ca celelalte forte trebuiesc cuantizate, fizicienii se gandesc ca asa e cazul si cu gravitatia. Dar da, curbura spatiutimpului da gravitatia, asa ca poate e gresit sa tratezi gravitatia ca pe celelalte forte si sa introduci gravitonul. O minoritate sprijina aceasta pozitie, spre care inclin si eu, in ciuda faptului ca s-a intamplat sa gasesc ceva ce sprijina punctul de vedere majoritar (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2586). Momentan nu cred ca existe sperante mari sa vedem daca gravitonii chiar exista, dar cine stie.

Rares Ispas said...

Salut,

Mersi de raspunsuri.

> Cel putin pentru mine nu e de la sine inteles ca teoria Big Bang e evident gresita.

Eu nu am afirmat ca este evident gresita, doar ca are niste "greutati" mari si dubioase.

Din pagina de la Cornell:
"According to the theory of inflation, the Universe grew by a factor of 10 to the sixtieth power in less than 10 to the negative thirty seconds, so the "edges" of the Universe were expanding away from each other faster than the speed of light;"

Este exact ceea ce eu numesc "magie", adica un eveniment unic, ce prezinta un factor de putere de 10^60 / 10^-30 = 10^90, nemaintalnit in restul istoriei universului. Adica proponentii BigBang-ului spun in esenta ca acolo se aplica cu totul alta regula. In plus, chiar daca teoria BigBang-ului muta majoritatea problemelor in momentul 0, tot nu rezolva problema, fiindca inflatia continua, accelerat.

Ti-am rasfoit articolele, ma depasesc dpdv matematic, felicitari pentru cunostiinte tale super avansate, insa, din ce am inteles eu, nu este suficienta schimbarea de coordonate, esenta este tot ca la Big Bang se aplica o alta regula.

Insa argumentul cel mai de "bun simt" contra Big Bang-ului este faptul ca redshift-ul este isotropic. Daca am fi in interiorul unui balon care se expansioneaza, in zona dinspre centrul balonului redshift-ul ar fi mult mai slab decat cel din directia opusa, spre exterior. In afara cazului in care te aflii chiar in centrul expansiunii, si cum nu ne aflam in vreun punct privilegiat, inseamna ca expansiunea isi are centrul pretutindeni. Sau nu?

"Radiatia de fond a fost prezisa de big bang,"
Prezisa, prezisa, doar ca ar fi trebuit sa fie mai densa inspre zona "centrului", si in descrestere continua. Este mult mai natural sa fie explicata printr-un proces continuu de generare, care nu necesita scamatorii superluminice, si aeropoarte care fug mai repede decat ajunge avionul la ele.

Cristi Stoica said...

Salut,

> Ti-am rasfoit articolele [...] insa, din ce am inteles eu, nu este suficienta schimbarea de coordonate, esenta este tot ca la Big Bang se aplica o alta regula.

Articolele mele se ocupa de singularitate in teoria big bang, dar nu si de inflatie. Nu am incercat sa rezolv problemele legate de teoria inflatiei. In cercetare, rar vine cineva si rezolva toate problemele odata. Faptul ca probleme inca exista arata ca persoana aceea nu a venit inca :) Eu mi-am propus modestul task de a ma ocupa de singularitate, si mi se pare ca din acest punct de vedere am reusit sa arat ca exista o singura regula, si diferenta e doar in faptul ca metrica devine degenerata la big bang.

> proponentii BigBang-ului spun in esenta ca acolo se aplica cu totul alta regula

Teoria big-bang a aparut inaintea teoriei inflatiei, si proponentii big-bang nu sunt tot una cu proponentii inflatiei, iar big-bangul nu e strict dependent de inflatie.

Nu stiu daca e corect sa zicem ca se aplica alta regula la inflatie, avand in vedere ca si acum expansiunea e accelerata. De fapt nu cred ca exista vreun model al inflatiei in care regula se schimba, doar ca inflatia are loc la rate diferite, ceea ce ar putea avea alta explicatie decat magia :) E ca si cum ai spune ca pe timp de criza economia functioneaza dupa cu totul alte legi, care duc la inflatie accelerata. Cred ca cel mai bine ar fi sa discuti cu cineva care se ocupa de teoria inflatiei. Ei stiu mai multe despre asta decat mine, si ar fi mai interesati. Daca discuti cu ei, folosirea unor expresii ca "si-au pus pietroi de gat", "magie", i-ar putea face sa creada ca ii iei la misto. Mai ales ca daca zici "scamatorii superluminice" si ei stiu ca nu e nicio scamatorie, nici o schimbare de regula, doar ceva contraintuitiv dar destul de natural in relativitate generala.